A. M. McPhail

Andrew M. McPhail founded the A.M. McPhail Piano Company in Boston Massachusetts during the year of 1837. McPhail’s production standards resulted in very high quality instruments. The company was incorporated in 1891.

The A.M. McPhail company was one of the major Boston piano makers and an early innovator. In fact, the McPhail company was one of the few piano makers that would later survive the Great Depression without being forced into bankruptcy or to merger with other makers.

In the 1920’s the company moved from their original address at 514 Washington St., Boston to 40 Waltham St..

For over a hundred years the company continued to build pianos, but in the 1950’s the A.M. McPhail piano company ceased production. The name was sold to Kohler & Campbell.

While the A.M. McPhail name may not be as universally recognizable as some other great piano makers of the 1800 and early 1900’s, these McPhail pianos are considered to be of very high quality and, the grand pianos in particular, are usually well worthy of rebuilding.

While the A.M. McPhail name may not be as recognized as other great maker of the 1800 and early 1900’s, these McPhail pianos are considered to be of very high quality and, the grand pianos in particular, are usually well worthy of rebuilding.

Usually the musician desiring to have an instrument rebuilt is not consider the costs as an monetarily recoupable investment, such as one might make in the stock markets. Rather, rebuilding an older quality piano is an opportunity to own a quality instrument for, usually, less than the expense of purchasing a brand new instrument of comparable quality.

The rebuilt instrument goes still beyond that of simply an opportunity of quality instrument ownership, but also (in many cases) a chance to own a piece of a history that is simply unable to be reproduced.

In a modern age where almost every personal possession is considered with an air of cold impersonal value (not being worth repairing since an exact impersonal duplicate may be had for less), the quality older piano represents an age in which no two products were exactly the same, a time when manufacturers considered the quality and durability of their products to be a direct representative of their company’s worth.

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